BRIDGES Pt. 2

Pictorial Selection

of those Spanning Disused Lines

(Original Timetables included)

by

Brian Haworth

 

Revised: 20 April 2017

Click on each photo to view the corresponding

Bradshaw 1910/1938 Timetable

when the respective line

was actually in use for passenger traffic.

Maps of the areas depicted may be viewed by clicking here

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS

 

xxxxxxxx

Stone-built skew overbridge at Sandside

on the Arnside to Hincaster Junction

(near Heversham) Branch,

which opened to traffic in 1876,

and closed in 1962.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone-arched bridge

on the Arnside to Hincaster Junction Branch,

which opened to traffic in 1876,

closed Arnside to Sandside in 1971

and finally Sandside to Hincaster Junction in 1963

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone staight-sided arch

on the Haltwhistle Alston Branch,

which opened to traffic in 1852,

and closed in 1976.

 

The track bed is now used by a narrow-gauge railway.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone-built Appersett Viaduct

on the Hawes Junction (Garsdale)

to Northallerton Branch,

 

which opened in parts during the 1870s,

and closed in 1959.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone arched bridge on the Padiham Loop Line,

which opened to traffic in 1877,

and closed in 1964.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The curved stone-built Martholme Viaduct.

Ten stone arches carried the Padiham loop line

over the River Calder.

 

The branch opened in 1877, and closed in 1964.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone-buttressed and plated-steel girder bridge

on the

Great Harwood Junction

to Rose Grove (Padiham Loop) Branch,

 

which opened to traffic in 1877, and closed in 1964.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone arch bridge on the

Burnley Bank Top to Bank Hall Colliery branch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

BLACKBURN - CHORLEY

 

 

   
 

Stone arched bridge

with additional stone-wing buttresses

on the Blackburn to Chorley Branch,

which opened to traffic in 1869,

and closed in 1966.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone arched bridge

on the Blackburn to Chorley Branch,

which opened to traffic in 1869,

and closed in 1966.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All that remains of the bridge,

which carried the Blackburn / Chorley Branch

over the Leeds / Liverpool Canal,

 

is a solitary stone bridge pier.

 

Of interest, is the drain pipe from the centre cess,

which was dripping on the day I took the photograph.

 

 

 

Three-arched stone brick-lined viaduct

on the Blackburn / Chorley Branch

 

 

View of the same viaduct showing the brick lining.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return to Top

 

Return to Bridges Pt.1

 

Return to Articles Menu

Return to Trailer Gallery

Return to Gallery 13 Home Page

 

Return to RVR Home Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

xxxxxxx

 

 

Stone-arched bridge

on the Accrington to Stubbins Junction line,

which opened to traffic in 1848,

and closed in 1966.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone-arched bridge

on the Accrington to Stubbins Junction line,

which opened to traffic in 1848,

and closed in 1966.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brick built bridge with iron support girders

on the Calderstones branch, near Whalley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone skew bridge on Burscough South Curve,

which opened to traffic in 1855,

and closed in 1962

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone and steel main span,

with stone and brick lined support arches,

on the Colne to Skipton Branch,

which opened to traffic in 1848,

and closed in 1970.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Out-of-use brick and girder bridges

at Ansdell and Fairhaven Station

on the now singled South Fylde line.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone arch bridge,

with added concrete support buttresses,

on the Westport to Westport Quay Branch,

 

which opened to traffic on 19 Nov 1893

and closed in 1977.

 

 

 

 

 

An amazing survivor

of the Midland Great Western's line

from Galway to Clifden,

which opened in 1895, and closed in 1935.

 

This bridge has been abandoned

for close to twice as long

as it was operational.

 

 

Stone-arched overbridge at Moate

on the mothballed Midland Great Western line

from Mullingar to Athlone.

 

 

Return to Top

 

Return to the Bridges Pt.1

Return to Articles Menu

Return to Trailer Gallery

Return to Gallery 13 Home Page

 

Return to RVR Home Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

xxxxxxx

Disused rail bridge

with stone parapets, wing walls and steel decking

between Church and Oswaldtwistle and Accrington,

and now in use as a cycle path and walkway

linking both stations.

 

The second bridge

with the yellow and black-hatched marking

carries the double track Blackburn /Colne lines.

 

View across same bridge

along former track bed

 

looking towards Church.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A similar bridge of stone and iron,

but closer to Accrington,

which allowed tracks to form

one side of the Accrington triangle.

View of track bed over the bridge,

looking towards Church

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KING STREET COAL BRANCH in BLACKBURN xxxxxx  
     
xxxxxx

The only bridge on the King Street Coal Branch

in Blackburn.

 

This rather ugly

steel-decked and red brick-buttressed bridge

still carries two tracks.

 

However, it has long been out-of-use

with little or no chance

of any traffic running over it again.

 

The building,

with the bay window just visible under the bridge,

is the former Cattlemarket Hotel,

 

The Cattle Market itself was situated

behind the brick wall on the right hand side,

looking under the bridge.

The same bridge but viewed from the other direction.

 

As can be imagined,

the road under the bridge regularly floods.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BURNLEY GAS WORKS BRANCH

 

The rather austere concrete and steel bridge

on the branch to Burnley Colliery,

the only bridge on this short branch.

 

Beyond the bridge can be seen a second bridge

carrying the current single line to Colne.

The same bridge viewed from the otherside.

 

The design and materials used on this bridge

are typical for a privately owned branch,

which was built exclusively for goods traffic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The view of the trackbed over the bridge

looking towards Burnley Central.

 

The single line spur from the main line

split into two tracks just before crossing the bridge.

 

Beyond the bridge the lines fanned out

to form several sidings to serve the gas works.

 

Burnley gas works had two privately-owned

Andrew Barclay 0-4-0 steam engines,

No 1 built 1927 and No 2 built 1938

specifically to work the branch

and its associated sidings.

 

 

 

 

ALSTON VIADUCT

 

   

 

This magnificent viaduct,

known locally as the 'Alston Arches'

was opened in 1851

by the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway.


Four segmental skew arches of the six

making up the viaduct

carried the line over the South Tyne river.

 

 

 

Closed in 1976, the unusual openings in the piers

were engineered in

to reduce the weight

on the viaduct piers and foundations.


The arches over the river

are provided with wedge shaped cutwaters

for flood and debris protection.


The viaduct is grade 2 listed.

 

 

 

 

View downstream towards the viaduct.

Recent floods have left the cutwaters

covered in debris.

View through the unusual pier arches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View looking upstream

clearly showing the layout

of the pier arches

View upstream

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View upstream

 

View of the road bridge

at the Haltwhistle end of the viaduct

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

XXXXX

Stone staight-sided arch

on the Haltwhistle - Alston Branch,

which opened to traffic in 1852,

and closed in 1976.

 

The track bed is now used by a narrow-gauge railway.

 

Return to Top of Bridges Pt. 2 Gallery

 

Return to Bridges Pt.1

 

Visit Bridges and Walk in South Wales

 

Return to Articles Menu

Return to Trailer Gallery

Return to Gallery 13 Home Page

 

Return to RVR Home Page