L O C O M O T I V E S

OF ERITREA AND THE FAR EAST

 

Photography

by

Ken Geddes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Asembagus No. 11, Orenstein & Koppel 0-6-0T (1920)

 

 

Cepu Forestry Railway 0-10-0 Schwartzkopf “Bahagia”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Olean Mill's Orenstein & Koppel 0-8-0T “Semaru

takes cane wagon empties to fields

 

Olean Mill's O &K 0-8-0T No 7 “Hiyang

takes a load of cane back to the mill.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Orenstein & Koppel 0-10-0 Luttermuller engine:

 

Gepol  Kerep Mill No. 4 of 1928

 

 

 

 

Eritrean steam!

Mallet 0-4 + 4-0T Ansaldo of 1938 442-59

and Breda 0-4-0T 202-010 (1932)

 

standing at Ghinda.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Eritrean Railway's diminutive Breda 0-4-0T shunter

had hardly enough power to take a single van up the gradient.

 

 

 

Sragi No. 8 is a bit of a mystery.

Apart from being 600mm gauge, I can find nothing more

 

 

 

 

Return to top

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Orenstein & Koppel Fireless loco No. 2

at Semboro Mill, Java.

 

Semboro use two of these for handling the powdery bagasse,

the waste product from the cane, which is a real fire hazard.

 

 

 

Asembagus's 700mm 0-8-0 O & K,

dating from 1920,

 

storms out of the cane fields,

assisted by the track sander at the front.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

A rather recent locomotive, for Java's sugar cane standards

is this Jung 0-6-0 built in 1961.

 

No. 29 still failed, and stranded us 2 miles away from the mill !

 

Orenstein & Koppel 0-4-2T of 1923

at Merican Mill, Java

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Cepu Forestry Railway, Java

 

0-10-0 Schwartzkopf (BMAG) “Bahagia

crosses a bridge with a train of “empties”.

 

The 3' 6” gauge system is now only for demonstration

as the teak forest has been depleted

by log poachers and unsustainable felling.

 

Tourist income is used for replanting.

 

 

Cepu Forestry Railway, Java.

 0-10-0 Schwartzkopf (BMAG) “Bahagia

crosses a bridge with a train of “empties”,

 

making a fine silhouette with less exposure

than in picture on the left.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Purodadi Mill's 700mm system used four light blue O & Ks. No. 5

dates from 1920.

 

The mill is awkwardly sited

with the yard on the opposite side of a deep river ravine,

crossed by a single-track girder bridge.

 

 

O & K 0-8-0 of the Tasik Madoe Mill, Java dating from 1913.

 

The gauge is 750mm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return to top

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

A 2-4-0 tank locomotive, B1304,

from one of the 3' 6” (1067mm) systems,

plinthed outside Cirebon Station

on Java's north coast.

 

 

Jatibarang's 600mm gauge diesel looking very smart.

 

 

The mill also operates five steam engines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

The Ambarawa Railway Museum in Java

is based on the former transhipment point

between the standard gauge line

from Kedungjati to the north-west

and the 3' 6” continuation to Yogyakarta (“Yogya”).

 

It still maintains the 1905-built rack section to Bedono.

 

A museum employee acts as lookout from the front balcony.

 

 

Ambarawa Railway Museum , Java.

 

A B25 class 0-4-2 RT, built around 1905 is pushing,

 

and has reached the

top of the rack section, 233m (765ft) long

 

and about 1,000m above Ambarawa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Cepu Forestry Railway 0-10-0 Schwartzkopf “Bahagia”.

 

 

 

Orenstein & Koppel 0-4-2T of 1923

at Merican Mill, Java

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Orenstein & Koppel 0-10-0 Luttermuller engine:

Gepol  Kerep Mill No. 4 of 1928

 

 

 

Tersana Baru's  1929 DuCroo & Brauns

parked in the mill yard

 

 

 

 

 

Return to top

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Purodadi No. 11 (1911).

Purodadi Mill's 700mm system used four light blue O & Ks. No. 5

dates from 1920.

 

The mill is awkwardly sited

with the yard on the opposite side of a deep river ravine,

crossed by a single-track girder bridge.

 

 

Purodadi No. 5 (1911)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

A 2-4-0 tank locomotive, B1304,

from one of the 3' 6” (1067mm) systems,

 

plinthed outside Cirebon Station

on Java's north coast.

 

 

Factory shunter, SY0191,

 

at Hangzhou Chemical Works, China

around 1979

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Chinese Diesels 0064 and 1732

taken well after sunset,

near to Mudangjiang

 

 

DFH 3 diesel  at a small depot, probably Aihe,

 

just east of Mudangjiang, North China

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

One of the most heroic sights in recent world steam:

a QJ with 15 or 16 coaches on

sweeps majestically and effortlessly

up a gradient near Mudangjiang.

 

The train probably originated at Vladivostok

over the Russian border.

 

Level crossing, traditional Chinese style,

near Tumen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return to top

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

SY 1600, one of the 43 working steam locomotives

at the giant 11-level open-caste mine site

at Zalai Nuer (Jalanur),

near the Siberian border,

 

pauses at the top of the coal washery road in about 2002.

 

Ironically, because of the demise of steam,

this pit is now working at only 40% capacity

and may already be closed.

 

The temperature was around -27C.

 

Recently out-shopped Chine Supershine JS 8120

 

at PingDingShan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Line-up at PingDingShan , China

Left to right: QJ 6650, JS 8062 and “Supershine” JS 8120.

 

Every year, the top crew of a depot had the right

to decorate their engine with various slogans,

which they kept as long as the engine lasted.

 

Would it be cynical to suggest that they found it wise

to choose something patriotic and praising the work ethic?

 

Anyway it made the engines colourful and attractive.

 

 

One of my first Chinese steam photographs from about 1992.

 

A 2-8-2 JS class No. 8482 simmers quietly

on a pickup goods turn

 

somewhere between Shanghai and Nanjing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

A rather recent locomotive for Java's sugar cane standards

is this Jung 0-6-0

built in 1961.

 

No. 29 still failed and stranded us

two miles away from the mill !

 

“The wrong side of the tracks” SY 1687

shunts coal wagons

at PingDingShan

 

with a scene of

unusual squalor and industrial pollution below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

SY 1769 pulls away from PingDingShan tender first

with a scheduled passenger working.

 

“PingDingShan” translates into

“ Flat Topped Mountain ” in English.

 

SY 1687 2-8-0 with coal empties

at PingDingShan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return to top

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

SY 1294, moving briskly, tender first

across a level crossing

 

with a rare passenger working

at Zalai Nuer.

 

 

 

A train headed by two 2-10-2 QJs

passes “ Farm Lane crossing”

 

near the summit of the Jingpeng Pass in 2002.

 

The temperature was -15C,

with light snow blowing in the strong wind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

An unidentified pair of QJs

coming off the Erdi viaduct (“ Brickworks Valley" )

 

in the Jingpeng Pass.

 

 

 

Driver's eye view from the cab of the second QJ

as it approaches Si Ying Mi viaduct

(aka “Horse Shoe Viaduct”,

 

near the summit of the Jingpeng pass

in Inner Mongolia .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Typical Soft Class waiting room,

China Rail

 

 

 

PingDingShan station, busy in 2002,

passing coal traffic and servicing point.

 

The oncoming engine is SY 0435

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Dumped remains of a British-built loco,

possibly KF1 class

 

built in 1935

by the Vulcan Foundry, Manchester.

 

Making final adjustments.

 

PingDingShan stabling and servicing depot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return to top

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
 

Cab of a Chinese SJ light mixed traffic engine.

 

 

Engine shed, Olean 's Mill, East Java

 

 

 

 

 

   

Return to top

Return to Gallery 13 Home Page

Return to RVR Home Page